Sarcophagraphic Novels: Understanding the Classical Comics

Arguably the most well-known piece of early Christian relief is the Junius Bassus Sarcophagus. Dated to 359 CE, it is a visual mix tape all recorded in expensive marble. It depicts a number of biblical scenes both from the New Testament (e.g., the lives of Christ, Peter, and Paul) and the Old Testament (e.g., Isaac, Garden of Eden), and frames … More Sarcophagraphic Novels: Understanding the Classical Comics

The Decline and Fall of the All-Male Panel: Compiling a List of Female Ancient Historians

It was my pleasure to attend the annual meeting of the SCS-AIA in San Francisco from January 6-10. I just got back to Iowa City last night, and wanted to write while the thoughts about the conference were still fresh in my mind. First, I want to say that the SCS-AIA always serves as an annual pep … More The Decline and Fall of the All-Male Panel: Compiling a List of Female Ancient Historians

Power of the Palindrome: Writing, Reading, and Wordplay (Part II)

I first began writing about palindromes when blogging for PhDiva, a superb blog run by classicist and archaeologist Dorothy King [Post HERE]. I will always be grateful to Dorothy for encouraging me to begin blogging, and just as I have continued to write, I have continued to be interested in palindromes, acrostics, and the use of writing … More Power of the Palindrome: Writing, Reading, and Wordplay (Part II)